The New Why Teams Don't Work

What Goes Wrong and How to Make It Right

Harvey Robbins (Author) | Michael Finley (Author)

Publication date: 01/01/2000

The New Why Teams Don't Work
  • Based on the authors' bestselling book Why Teams Don't Work-winner of the Financial Times/Booz Allen & Hamilton Global Business Book Award as the Best Management Book of the Year in the Americas

  • Teaches people how to be good team members and teaches team members how to be team leaders

  • Includes seven completely new chapters as well as new and updated examples and information throughout

The move to teams has largely failed, say Harvey Robbins and Michael Finley, mainly because teams themselves are failing to think through the human implications of teaming. The New Why Teams Don't Work is a handbook for team members and team leaders to maintain the highest possible level of team intelligence-the skills, attitudes, and emotional flexibility to get the most out of a team's inherent differences.

Describing what teams are really like, not how they ought to be, the book teaches people how to work together to make decisions, stay in budget, and achieve team goals. Robbins and Finley show, for instance, how to get hidden agendas on the table, clarify individual roles, learn what team members expect and want from each other, choose the right decision-making process, and much more.

Updated throughout, the book includes completely new material on team intelligence, team technology, collaboration vs. teamwork, team balance, teams at the top, the team of one, plus all new and updated examples.

  • Based on the authors' bestselling book Why Teams Don't Work-winner of the Financial Times/Booz Allen & Hamilton Global Business Book Award as the Best Management Book of the Year in the Americas

  • Teaches people how to be good team members and teaches team members how to be team leaders

  • Includes seven completely new chapters as well as new and updated examples and information throughout

The move to teams has largely failed, say Harvey Robbins and Michael Finley, mainly because teams themselves are failing to think through the human implications of teaming. The New Why Teams Don't Work is a handbook for team members and team leaders to maintain the highest possible level of team intelligence-the skills, attitudes, and emotional flexibility to get the most out of a team's inherent differences.

Describing what teams are really like, not how they ought to be, the book teaches people how to work together to make decisions, stay in budget, and achieve team goals. Robbins and Finley show, for instance, how to get hidden agendas on the table, clarify individual roles, learn what team members expect and want from each other, choose the right decision-making process, and much more.

Updated throughout, the book includes completely new material on team intelligence, team technology, collaboration vs. teamwork, team balance, teams at the top, the team of one, plus all new and updated examples.

Read more and meet author below

Read An Excerpt

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Overview

  • Based on the authors' bestselling book Why Teams Don't Work-winner of the Financial Times/Booz Allen & Hamilton Global Business Book Award as the Best Management Book of the Year in the Americas

  • Teaches people how to be good team members and teaches team members how to be team leaders

  • Includes seven completely new chapters as well as new and updated examples and information throughout

The move to teams has largely failed, say Harvey Robbins and Michael Finley, mainly because teams themselves are failing to think through the human implications of teaming. The New Why Teams Don't Work is a handbook for team members and team leaders to maintain the highest possible level of team intelligence-the skills, attitudes, and emotional flexibility to get the most out of a team's inherent differences.

Describing what teams are really like, not how they ought to be, the book teaches people how to work together to make decisions, stay in budget, and achieve team goals. Robbins and Finley show, for instance, how to get hidden agendas on the table, clarify individual roles, learn what team members expect and want from each other, choose the right decision-making process, and much more.

Updated throughout, the book includes completely new material on team intelligence, team technology, collaboration vs. teamwork, team balance, teams at the top, the team of one, plus all new and updated examples.

  • Based on the authors' bestselling book Why Teams Don't Work-winner of the Financial Times/Booz Allen & Hamilton Global Business Book Award as the Best Management Book of the Year in the Americas

  • Teaches people how to be good team members and teaches team members how to be team leaders

  • Includes seven completely new chapters as well as new and updated examples and information throughout

The move to teams has largely failed, say Harvey Robbins and Michael Finley, mainly because teams themselves are failing to think through the human implications of teaming. The New Why Teams Don't Work is a handbook for team members and team leaders to maintain the highest possible level of team intelligence-the skills, attitudes, and emotional flexibility to get the most out of a team's inherent differences.

Describing what teams are really like, not how they ought to be, the book teaches people how to work together to make decisions, stay in budget, and achieve team goals. Robbins and Finley show, for instance, how to get hidden agendas on the table, clarify individual roles, learn what team members expect and want from each other, choose the right decision-making process, and much more.

Updated throughout, the book includes completely new material on team intelligence, team technology, collaboration vs. teamwork, team balance, teams at the top, the team of one, plus all new and updated examples.

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Meet the Authors


Visit Author Page - Harvey Robbins

Harvey Robbins, president of Robbins & Robbins, has been a practicing business psychologist since 1974, providing training and coaching in leadership, teamwork, change mangement, and interpersonal effectiveness His clients have included American Express, AT&T, Allied Signal, General Dynamics, 3M, Johnson & Johnson, the FBI, CIA, and the IRS, among many others. He is author of eight books including Turf Wars and How to Speak and Listen Effectively, Why Teams Don't Work, The Accidental Leader, etc..

He conducts workshops and presentations both nationally and internationally and is a Senior Fellow of Executive Education at the Carlson School of Mangement at the University of Minnesota.



Visit Author Page - Michael Finley

Michael Finley has authored over a dozen books, including award-winning collaborations with Harvey Robbins that include Transcompetition, Why Teams Don't Work, and Why Change Doesn't Work. Future Shoes, his weekly syndicated column on modern life, appears in newspapers and trade magazines throughout the country, as well as in online editions.

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1: The Team Ideal

Chapter 2: Team Instinct

Chapter 3: Individual Needs vs. Team Needs

Chapter 4: Teamwork vs. Socialwork

Chapter 5: Misplaced Goals, Confused Objectives

Chapter 6: Bad Decision Making

Chapter 7: Uncertain Boundaries

Chapter 8: Unresolved Roles

Chapter 9: The Wrong Policies and Procedures

Chapter 10: The People Problem

Chapter 11: Dealing with Difficult People

Chapter 12: Leadership Failure

Chapter 13: Faulty Vision

Chapter 14: Toxic Teaming Atmosphere

Chapter 15: Competitive Hazards

Chapter 16: Communication Shortfalls

Chapter 17: Rewards and Recognition

Chapter 18: Trust Hell

Chapter 19: Change Issues

Chapter 20: The Myth of Adventure Learning

Chapter 21: The Myth that Sport Teams and Work Teams Are Similar

Chapter 22: The Myth of Personality Type

Chapter 23: Myths of Team Leadership

Chapter 24: The Myth that People Like Working Together

Chapter 25: The Myth that Teamwork Is More Productive than Individual Work

Chapter 26: The Myth of 'The More, the Merrier' on Teams

Chapter 27: The Myth that Teams Must Somehow Have More than One Team Member to be a Team

Chapter 28: The Myth that Teams Work Everywhere

Chapter 29: Moving Teams through Stages toward Success

Chapter 30: Teams and Technology

Chapter 31: Long-Term Team Health

Epilogue: Toward Team Intelligence

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Excerpt

 Macroshift

9781576751787_0022_001

3

WE LIVE IN AN ERA OF DEEP-SEATED TRANSFORMATION—a shift in civilization. Its signs and manifestations are all around us. While globalization is integrating production, trade, finance, and communication, it is producing a social and ecological backlash characterized by regional unemployment, widening income gaps, and environmental degradation. The benefits of economic growth, for long the main indicator of progress, are becoming more and more concentrated. Hundreds of millions live at a higher material standard of living, but thousands of millions are pressed into abject poverty, living in shantytowns and urban ghettos in the shadows of ostentatious affluence. This is socially and politically explosive: it fuels resentment and revolt and provokes massive migration from the countryside to the cities, and from the poorer to the richer regions. In such conditions organized crime, already growing into a global enterprise, finds fertile ground with a gamut of activities ranging from information fraud to traffic in arms, drugs, and human organs.

The application of new technologies, another indicator of progress, is a two-edged sword. Nuclear power promises an unlimited supply of commercial energy, but disposal of nuclear wastes and decommissioning aging reactors pose unsolved puzzles, and the specter of nuclear meltdown, whether due to technical accident or intentional terrorism, remains unchallenged. Genetic engineering has a fabulous potential for creating virus-resistant and protein-rich plants, improved breeds of animals, vast supplies of animal proteins, and microorganisms capable of producing proteins and hormones and improving photosynthesis. But genetic engineering can also produce lethal biological weapons and pathogenic microorganisms, destroy the diversity and the balance of nature, and create abnormal—and abnormally aggressive—insects and animals.

4

Our information technologies could create a globally interacting yet locally diverse civilization, enabling all people to be linked whatever their culture and ethnic or national origin. But if these networks remain dominated by the power groups that brought them into being, they will serve only the narrowly focused interests of a small minority of people and marginalize the rest. If the Internet, television, and the electronic and print media become further commercialized, these media will cater to the demands of those who have the means to enter the global marketplace rather than giving voice to all people. Worse than that, the cyberspace of telecommunications could become a new medium for information warfare, intolerant cultural influences, pornography, and crime.

But the macroshift today harbors not only danger; it is also the cradle of opportunity. Our globalized technological civilization could break down in chaos and anarchy—or it could break through to a more humane and sustainable world. The choice between these possibilities will not be made by applying technological fixes or implementing strategies based on the same kind of thinking that created today’s unsustainabilities. As this report will show, to master our destiny we need new thinking, new values—a new consciousness.

In this opening Part we first review the nature and dynamics of macroshifts, and then describe how they came about in history and how the one we now experience is unfolding in the contemporary world. We then outline the factors that influence its unfolding and show that they are not written in the stars but depend on the evolution of our values and behaviors. The oft-neglected value-sensitivity of macroshifts is what opens for us a real opportunity to choose our destiny—and the unprecedented responsibility to choose it wisely.

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Endorsements

"Finley and Robbins set us on a compelling journey to teams success by helping us see and embrace the secrets we often hide from ourselves and our teammates."

-- Richard J. Leider, author of The Power of Purpose and coauthor of Repacking Your Bags


"This is an immensely helpful book. Finley and Robbins show that the secret of great teams isn't found in buzzwords or gimmicks, but in bringing out the best in every individual. Their suggestions are compassionate, yet tough-minded and practical."

-- Robert K. Cooper, Ph.D., author of The Performance Edge and Executive EQ


"Why Teams Don't Work is that rarest of beasts: a book of truths."

-- Jim Kane, Amazon.com


"Robbins and Finley are provocative writers... the read is fast, funny, and highly stimulating."

-- Business Book Review

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